Inro with Ojime and Nestuke

22.1800

Inro with Ojime and Nestuke

22.1800

Description

Inro (literally, “seal basket”) are small containers to keep items like seals and medicines. They were hung on a cord which was passed through a bead called Ojime, then through a decorative toggle called Netsuke which was pushed behind the Obi (sash) of a Kimono to emerge at the top. These came into use during the 17th century and were an important personal accessory for Japanese men of the period. The decoration of inro reflected their wearer’s importance and they were a symbol of his taste, status, and wealth.
Netsuke developed from being strictly utilitarian to an object of extraordinary craftsmanship. The design reflects important aspects of Japanese folklore and life.
Sir Ratan Tata Art Collection

Collection

Japanese Art

Object Type

Inro Nestuke Ojime

Material

Ivory, Lacquer

Culture/Period

Meiji

Technique

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Date

1868–1912 CE

Location

Japan

Dimension

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