Jewellery Box

22.1907

Jewellery Box

22.1907

Description

The Mughal emperors’ fascination with beautiful delicate jalis was not confined to architectural decoration but was also reflected in utilitarian objects like boxes, screens, paper-cutters, photo frames, and combs. The designs include geometrical patterns (girih bandi) and floral scroll patterns. Flowers, plants, trees, and geometrical patterns were a form of decoration specially sanctioned by Islamic theologians, against the depiction of figures. Paradise is described in the Quran as gardens (Jannat) full of trees, plants, and flowers. To invest in buildings and objects of day-to-day use with a quality of eternal bliss, they were decorated with flowering plants and floral jalis. This intricately carved box has panels with floral and geometrical patterns. The lid is trapezoidal in shape with similar designs and is fitted to the box by two hinges. The box rests on four legs each carved in the shape of a lion’s head. A small lock with a keyhole is fitted to the box. The designs are carved out with great skill in thin sheets of ivory, making it look like lace. The sheets are perfectly joined to make the walls and lid of the box. This marvel of Indian ivory carving is likely to have been one of the best entries selected for the Indian Art Exhibition at Delhi in the year 1903.
Sir Ratan Tata Art Collection.

Collection

Indian Decorative Art

Object Type

Box

Material

Ivory

Schools/Culture/Period

--

Technique

--

Date

1903 CE

Location

Delhi

Dimension

21.9 x 32.9 x 22.5 cm