Storage Jar

1637

Storage Jar

1637

Description

The Harappan jar consists of three parts- a narrow base that is usually made in a chuck or using a mould, a large rounded body and a narrow neck, both of which were made separately and added on to the base. The points where the three sections are attached are smoothed over. But since the mid-section of the jar is thick and heavy, the string is tied around this section to keep it together after the pot has been shaped. The string leaves an impression on the soft clay when the jar is fired and the string burns away.

The jar is coated with a red or purple-black slip on the inside and a black or purple-black slip on the outside. The slips that create an impermeable surface, the large size of the jar and their narrow necks suggest that they were most suitable for storing liquids (wine or water) or grains.
Similar jars have been found in a number of Indus sites such as Harappa, Mohenjodaro, Chanhudaro and others. They have also been found in Hili in modern-day UAE and since they are not part of the local assemblage there, it clearly shows that these jars were brought there from Harappan sites.

Collection

Ancient Civilisations

Object Type

Pot

Material

Terracotta

Schools/Culture/Period

Indus Valley Civilisation

Technique

--

Date

2500–1900 BCE

Location

Harappa

Dimension

H 93.0 cm, 248.06 cm (max. circumference)